The sculptures of Jean-Jacques Porret are sensual and pleasing to our senses


#420 notorious

# 443 Evening Beauty, green patina

# 443 Evening Beauty, green patina

#444 Joy Girl

#444 Joy Girl

The sculptures of Jean-Jacques Porret are sensual, attractive, pleasant to the sight and to the touch.

My work is figurative, but it is not about the figure.

—Jean-Jacques Porret

NEW YORK, NEW YORK, USA, July 6, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Jean-Jacques Porret received the Top 60 Masters of ATIM award from ArtTour International magazine. Originally from Switzerland, this artist has gained worldwide recognition for his creative sculptures. Here we want to share an interview with this master artist.

What inspires you? What connection do you have with your art?

“Everyone is continually influenced by everything. We can’t learn to be an artist or a creator. It’s something we’re born with. So many people try to be artists, but they lack that little bit of crazy element called “being creative”. To illustrate, Rembrandt was an excellent painter, yes, but not creative; he painted what he saw. VanGogh was perhaps not a great painter but a fantastic creator. He painted what influenced him. Both were great artists. We have to define the word “creative”. I’m sure most people would have a different definition. For me, it has to do with IMAGINATION. I don’t know the dictionary definition, but to create is for the cook to use just the right amount of salt in the potatoes, knowing when it’s too much or not enough. Look at Jacques Peppin; no book of kitchen, no teleprompter, it just does it; it creates a meal, using his feelings, his imagination. He is the perfect cook artist.

What does your art mean?

“It’s hard not to be influenced. I met many of the greatest sculptors of the 60s, 70s and 80s, and yes I was influenced by them, but not anymore. I constantly have to be very careful and refuse to be influenced. I create my style, my path; I create from my imagination. I am more interested in communicating an abstract feeling or idea than an actual image. My work is figurative, but it is not about no figure.

What is your biggest obstacle to being an artist? How do you approach it?

“Recognition. Today, people are more interested in the new wave of electronic toys, smartphones, electronic games, etc. People no longer look at the aesthetics and beauty of things. I believe that my sculptures are sensual, attractive and pleasing to look at. the eyes and the touch. People don’t need to wonder what it is, what it looks like or what it’s supposed to be. I guess showing these sculptures in could, in time, bring me the recognition I need. believe that I am creating something that will outlive me in this world.”

What does generosity mean to you as an artist? How do you emulate that?

“Unfortunately I’m not interested in teaching because, as I said earlier, I don’t believe you can learn to be an artist. Many galleries and even museums exhibit sculpture or art. so-called avant-garde art. Most of them are not creative and even lack total imagination. It seems that the more they disturb aesthetics and beauty, the better. Is that it what is called inspiration Art does not need to be representative of an existing image but should be fluid and enjoyable They are creative artists who deserved to be recognized, and I would like to create a book or a series of books illustrating them accordingly.”

What’s next for your creative projects?

“Keep doing what I love to do, sculpt and create.”

Jean-Jacques Porret was also featured in the Amazon Best-Seller book, ATIM’s Top 60 Masters, published by ArtTour International Magazine. This book features all the artists awarded the 2022 ATIM Top 60 Masters Awards

To learn more about this artist, please visit http://www.jjporret.com/
.
.
.

.
.
.
News provided by Viviana Puello for ArtTour International Magazine

Viviana Puello Grimandi
International Art Tour magazine
[email protected]
Visit us on social media:
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Other

Previous [email protected]: Makerere Literature Department Celebrates First Doctoral Graduate “Uncle Tim”
Next Macfarlane commissions challenge stereotypes of painting